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To work around this specific issue, you might try temporarily change the statement_timeout parameter in your database.

Find the file postgresql.conf, change the value there, restart the database, then run the migrations. Default value for the statement timeout is 0, which means the timeout is turned off.

The second issue is due to incomplete migrations. Any time you see something like "column X does not exist" it means the database is not in sync with the code and most likely means that some migrations were not run.

To work around this specific issue, you might try temporarily change the statement_timeout parameter in your database.

Find the file postgresql.conf, change the value there, restart the database, then run the migrations. Default value for the statement timeout is 0, which means the timeout is turned off.

The second issue is due to incomplete migrations. Any time you see something like "column X does not exist" it means the database is not in sync with the code and most likely means that some migrations were not run.

edit: if you can't change the postgres.conf file, then you can try running the postgres scripts used in the failing migration manually like so:

PGOPTIONS="-c statement_timeout=60000" psql -U dbname dbname < the_script.sql

Then fake-apply the corresponding migration.

Also: not verified, but it's possible that the statement timeout in the postgresql backend can be configured in django via options to the DATABASES setting, please investigate.

To work around this specific issue, you might try temporarily change the statement_timeout parameter in your database.

Find the file postgresql.conf, change the value there, restart the database, then run the migrations. Default value for the statement timeout is 0, which means the timeout is turned off.

The second issue is due to incomplete migrations. Any time you see something like "column X does not exist" it means the database is not in sync with the code and most likely means that some migrations were not run.

edit: if you can't change the postgres.conf file, then you can try running the postgres scripts used in the failing migration manually like so:

PGOPTIONS="-c statement_timeout=60000" psql -U dbname dbuser dbname < the_script.sql

Then fake-apply the corresponding migration.

Also: not verified, but it's possible that the statement timeout in the postgresql backend can be configured in django via options to the DATABASES setting, please investigate.